Pat Hobaugh

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About the Artists:

Witness Pat Hobaugh's quest to explore and explode the traditional idea of the representational still life.
Hobaugh's subjects examine the cultural indoctrination and development of early adolescent children via toy action figures and iconic packaged foods, serving as a window into the world of childhood mythos.

Biography:

Pat Hobaugh grew up on a small farm in rural Indiana. He did not study art in his first sixteen years of school, and it was not until his last year in college when he took an Art History course that his path in life was forever altered. He fell in love with the Old Masters and started to teach himself to paint. After several years of self-education, he went back to school to earn bachelors and master degrees in painting from The University of Iowa and The University of Wisconsin-Madison, respectively. He has shown work in numerous exhibitions and galleries throughout the country. He currently resides in Atlanta Georgia, where he paints and teaches art at Georgia State University.
 Hobaugh_Resume.doc

 

Statement:

My still life work is a quest in exploring and exploding the traditional idea of the representational still life. These paintings began as an examination of the cultural indoctrination and development of early adolescent children via toy action figures. The compositions for the work have been inspired from famous paintings of the past such as David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps, American Revolutionary War masterpieces by the artists; John Trumbull, Benjamin West, and John Singleton Copley, and the fantastically absurd canvases of Hieronymous Bosch and Pieter Breughel the Elder. Furthermore, this work has also been inspired by Joseph Campbell’s writings, which focus on the idea of the ubiquitous Hero found in religion, war, politics, mythology, and film. The paintings are completed with a sense of playfulness so as to keep a sense of humor in them, and overall, they serve as a window into the world where a child’s mythos of heroes and villains are formed. Recently, the still lifes have expanded to include an examination and comparison of themes from past and present popular culture, such as sugary snacks and breakfast cereals.